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How to Manage Gout and Live Your Life

August 02, 2021

“You can afford to be optimistic," says Peter, who’s one of several people with gout interviewed by health awareness website Healthtalk.org. For Peter, it’s important to remain positive and to keep learning more about the disease. Just like many others, he believes it’s possible to manage gout and carry on living a normal life. 

Studies currently show that over 9.2 million adults in the United States have gout. This condition doesn’t discriminate; it affects men, women, and even young adults. The statistics may cause some level of fear or worry in many people, but gout is one of the few preventable and manageable forms of arthritis, according to the Harvard Medical School. The real challenge is making sure people are informed about the disease and getting the right care. 

In this article, we’ll help you understand what gout is and what your options are in managing it, ranging from prescription medicine to tart cherry supplements for uric acid control.  

Understand Gout  

Understanding what gout is and how it affects you is already an important first step in taking back your life from the disease. It helps you distinguish facts from myths, like women not being affected by gout or that only wealthy people can get it. Believing in the wrong thing can lead you to make uninformed decisions. 

Gout is a form of arthritis caused by the overabundance of uric acid in the body. Uric acid is a waste product found in the blood that usually dissolves or goes through the kidney and leaves the body through urine. 

Too much uric acid causes a condition called hyperuricemia, which causes the symptoms associated with gout: swelling, pain, and redness usually found in the joint behind the big toe. Lowering uric acid levels is the key to dealing with gout attacks. You have several options. 

doctor holding patient's hand

Consult a Doctor 

One is to seek a doctor’s recommendation. If you have a history of gout or feel like you’re suffering from its symptoms, it’s wise to be checked properly. Your doctor can prescribe a few medicines that will help you go back to living a normal life. They might prescribe: 

  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): Helps reduce pain and swelling, especially during an attack. Many NSAIDs are available over the counter at low doses, but higher doses need a prescription. 
  • Colchicine: Prevents uric acid in the body from forming urate crystals, which cause painful symptoms. They can be prescribed for daily use. 
  • Allopurinol: Reduces the amount of uric acid in the body. It helps prevent future attacks if taken as prescribed. 

Other prescriptions are available to manage gout. While many of them can be effective, their effects can be different for each person. Consulting a medical specialist first is a good course of action when considering these options. 

Try Natural Alternatives   

One positive thing about gout is the abundance of natural alternatives to aid in your gout control regimen. Some may even surprise you, as they’re available anywhere. 

Tart Cherry Extract  

Cherry juice contains anthocyanins, which not only give cherries their deep rich color, but may also offer support for reducing uric acid, and help boost your body’s natural ability to reduce inflammation.

What are the benefits of tart cherry extracts? 

A 2011 study found that drinking 8 ounces of tart cherry juice every day for four weeks significantly lowered uric acid levels. 

How many mg of tart cherry should you take for gout?    

The recommended dosage is 2,500 mg daily. However, this may vary depending on your health status, so speaking with a doctor is ideal.  

Boswellia Serrata Extract 

Boswellia is also known as Indian frankincense. It is an herbal extract from the Boswellia serrata tree. It’s been used for centuries to support the body’s natural ability to reduce inflammation. 

What are the benefits of Boswellia serrata extract? 

Boswellia is effective in supporting the body’s natural ability to reduce inflammation associated with gout. One study found1 that enriched Boswellia extract improves physical activity and decreases knee pain from osteoarthritis.‡

How many mg of Boswellia serrata extract should you take?    

General dosing guidelines suggest taking 300-500 mg three times a day. Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions or talk to your doctor to be certain. 

Celery Seed Extract 

Celery seeds contain many beneficial plant compounds, including luteolin, which may play a role in supporting your body’s ability to balance uric acid production.‡  

What are the benefits of celery seed extract? 

Celery seeds can potentially help with inflammation. Another compound found in celery seeds, 3-n-butylphthalide (3nB), which may also help the body’s natural ability to reduce inflammation associated with gout.

How many mg of celery seed extract should you take?   

There is currently no definite amount recommended; current research has different answers regarding the right dosage for celery seed extract. You should check with your health care provider when adding any new ingredient to your daily routine. 

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There’s Always a Way 

Having gout can be challenging, isolating, and, in some cases, debilitating. However, we've shown how you could live with gout but still lead a fulfilling life. Being diagnosed with gout isn’t the end of the world. It is possible to manage this disease and continue living a normal life. 

At Go-Out, we have invested in your well-being. We provide high-quality natural supplements for high uric acid and gout maintenance. If you want to learn more about our products, feel free to contact us today. Our team will be happy to assist you.

 

‡ These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

References:

1 Vishal AA, Mishra A, Raychaudhuri SP. A Double Blind, Randomized, Placebo Controlled Clinical Study Evaluates the Early Efficacy of Aflapin® in Subjects with Osteoarthritis of Knee. Int J Med Sci 2011; 8(7):615-622. doi:10.7150/ijms.8.615. Available from https://www.medsci.org/v08p0615.htm